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Prenatal Story Sessions

A Vital Task of True Prenatal Preparation:
Transforming a belief or a story I am bringing to my birth

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At the heart of every birth story is a “seed” from which it began to grow. You might think the story seed was first planted during labor when that unwished-for something caused disappointment or distress. More often, it may be that that unexpected or unwished-for event watered a dormant seed of belief, judgment, or an agreement (to avoid it). Only later, after labor, when mulling over what happened we may realize we are harvesting fruit from a judgment or agreement planted long ago.

Birth stories have long tails; they don’t begin with the first contraction or when the water breaks, or even during pregnancy. Part of the Story you are telling yourself about birth (which includes your beliefs) started innocently and unconsciously in childhood with the earliest stories you heard about birth, babies, hospitals, pain, and losing control. Children don't understand the nuances of the adult world, including the world of modern obstetrics, which most adults struggle to understand as well.


Kids can be overwhelmed by their mother's distress. And, because they can't yet understand the layers of context when a child hears emotionally-charged stories around birth, they create vivid imagery and make assumptions and agreements tucked away in memory. As a result, decades later, when writing a birth plan, the child, now an adult unwittingly dips their pen into an inkwell that holds forgotten images and fleeting agreements.

 

It isn't only the stories you heard in childhood that influence your expectations, decisions, and peace of mind, but also the countless fragments of raw, emotionally-charged birth stories from friends and strangers. Unfortunately, unexamined fears and beliefs may prevent you from being prepared to meet the unexpected realities that can emerge in childbirth. In addition, being unprepared can predispose to self-judgment, blame, and emotional shock. By proactively seeking a prenatal Birth Story Medicine session, you change how you are already writing the story.
 

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In traditional cultures, initiates are not expected 
to prepare and initiate themselves before crossing 
the Threshold into the unknown, 
or before entering a new stage of life. 
While evidence-based information is accessible to all, 
the path less known — the mythic way of inner knowing — 
must be actively sought.

In your prenatal preparation session, you may want to . . .


•    Explore family birth beliefs and stories that are limiting for you
•    Go on a guided Birth Tiger Safari to reframe and tame your fears
•    Get down-to-earth preparation to meet the uncertainty and intensity of labor
•    Heal a broken heart, or shattered dream from a previous birth
•    Transcend magical thinking and get real before birth

"I’m ready to set my intention and expand my potential
in preparation for my rite of passage.
"The day on which one starts out
is not the time to start one's preparation."

 

~ Nigerian Folk Saying

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